Do You Have a High Performing Team?

Why do some teams perform well and others struggle to meet their deliverables? It is clear when things are going well. However, when teams are struggling, it is not always clear where the problems are and how to remedy them. What follows is a checklist that you can use to assess the strengths and weaknesses of your teams. It breaks down how a team functions into its component parts. By completing this assessment you will be able to identify and focus on those areas that could use improvement. As you work with your teams you need to keep in mind these core concepts.

Team Truths: Every team at some stage will struggle with the dilemma that it is difficult to balance loyalty to the team goals and loyalty to our individual styles. Getting diversity of style/personality to work for the team rather than tearing it apart is essential for team success.

Team Dilemmas: In addition it is important to remember that multiple realities exist. To argue rights and wrongs drains energy from team goals.

We must respect the right to differ from one another. Disrespect leads to divisiveness.

Here is the check list that you can use to assess the strengths and weaknesses of your teams.

1. Clear Charter. The foundation of the team is that of clear and common goals, so that the team understands how success is going to be measured. These have to be well articulated and understood by all.

2. Commitment to Team Members and Team Goals. Understanding the team goals is not the same as buying into them. Everyone needs to commit to the goals. In addition, a common source of difficulties can arise when people are committed to the goals but dislike other team members. However diversity of style and personality are at the heart of successful teams as these differences foster creativity. Team building exercises can help individuals to appreciate diversity and to teach them how to work together cooperatively. Dislike can be replaced by respecting differences.

3. Meets Team Deliverables. Successful teams, meet their deliverables consistently. To accomplish this, communications must flow freely and in all directions. In meetings, decisions are made effectively and communication is productive.

4. Clear Roles and Responsibilities It is vital to have clear roles and role definition as well as clarity around the responsibilities that each role entails. Blurred responsibilities can lead to power struggles and conflict.

5. Competent Team Members. Competent team members need to be placed in the right position. At times a highly talented person can be ill placed which can throw off the team functioning. Consider both the competency and placement of each individual.

6. Ongoing Feedback and Evaluation. In order to ensure success, well functioning teams provide and encourage ongoing feedback in all directions. This allows for mid course evaluation and corrections as needed as well as encouragement for a job well done. Read more

7. Creative Problem Solving. Problems are a fact of life. The ability to problem solve effectively and creatively is what makes lemonade out of lemons.

8. Effective Conflict Resolution. Conflict can be among team members, with other departments, or other companies. Successful conflict resolution takes divisive energy and redirects it to positive ends. Read about our conflict resolution services.

9. Good Morale. Low turnover and longevity is a benchmark of good morale. A team that successfully values the individual as well as the team has the best likelihood of success.

10. Good Relationships. Your relationships with other internal groups are an independent barometer of your teams functioning. High performance teams are respected by the rest of the organization as they meet deliverables and work cohesively.

After completing this assessment you will be able to identify and focus on those areas that could use improvement. Understanding any problem is the first step to resolution. Please contact us if you would like to discuss how our team building and development services can help your teams become more productive.

Fun at Work Helps Retain Employees

Top organizations recognize that great employees are far more likely to remain long-term employees when they allow employees to lighten up and have a little fun. Here are several examples on how progressive organizations increase their retention of great employees through allowing themselves to lighten up.

Have Fun or Get Fired: The unofficial mission at the innovation-driven Paradigm Communication, the St. Petersburg, FL software developer, “have fun or get fired.” Realizing that their high stress and long hours is prime for massive burn-outs, Paradigm’s owner, Dan Furlong, also enforces a specific and well thought out dress code and attendance policy. Here is their entire dress code and attendance policy at Paradigm: show up for work, and wear something.

No Class E-mail: It can be incredibly frustrating trying to weed through mounds of e-mail attempting to figure out which ones are important and which ones are not. Tandem Computers came up with a light-hearted twist to their internal communication system. Tandem now has three levels of internal e-mail:

o”First Class” e-mail is all business and it should be read.

o”Second Class” e-mail is for interesting ideas and suggestions, a good place to go for hot topics and concepts.

o”No Class” e-mail is for humor and classified ads, a great place to stop when you need a quick mental break.

This e-mail classification structure allows everyone at Tandem to quickly sort what is important, good to know, and just plain fun.

Back to School: The 2008 annual meeting for financial analysts at innovation-driven Cognex, the Massachusetts optical products giant, was organized like any other financial analyst meeting – a day in elementary school. After being picked up in a yellow school bus, the analysts were driven to a meeting facility decked out with blackboards, lunch boxes, and even pop quizzes. Naturally, the annual report was made to look like coloring books. What else would you expect from a company that calls all its employees “Cognoids” and carefully trains staff to properly execute their official company salute modeled after, who else, the Three Stooges (right hand sharply brought to the bridge of the nose). With the strength to lighten up, Cognex consistently attracts and retain great employees from throughout the Northeast.

20 Percent Impact: At the spirit-driven McGuffey’s Restaurants chain, fun is taken very seriously. Fun is so serious that 20 percent of a manager’s annual raise is tied to how much fun he or she is to work with. Management fired their number two producing manager because he was an absolute tyrant and was not uplifting to his team. This best practice beautifully illustrates how creating a fun environment should be driven from the top-down and consistently reinforced.

Stump the CEO: Many great organizations are finding fun ways to keep executives in the face of employees while simultaneously showing the lighter side of business. One such company, AGI, Inc., the Melrose Park, IL cosmetics packaging company, awards prizes during their monthly employee meetings to the person who asks their CEO the toughest question. By demonstrating a willingness to be held accountable for the tough issues and to do so in a humorous way, operational excellence-driven organizations like AGI create strong connections that help drive the retention of great employees.

Be Loose and Have Fun: Aligned companies need not have fancy, page long, eloquently developed mission statements to retain great employees. Often, the simpler the better. One example comes from Great Harvest Bread, the spirit-driven franchise natural bread retailer, whose mission is to “Be Loose and Have Fun.” Given only minimal operational guidelines, their franchise agreement specifically reads “anything not expressly forbidden by the language of this document IS allowed!” No two stores look alike. Franchisees are allowed to tinker with pricing and recipes. There are no home office inspections. By living their spirit-driven mission, Great Harvest builds powerful retention connections with its diverse franchisees.

Happiness Barometer Team: The wonderfully progressive and spirit-driven Rosenbluth International Travel Group is known for their innovative, proactive employee relations strategies. They understand that happy employees are most often more productive and more likely to stay than sad employees are. One technique they use to keep tabs on employee morale is the Happiness Barometer Team, a group of employees who are charged with conducting a benchmark attitude and enjoyment needs survey every six months. Just with a name like Happiness Barometer Team, employees realize that Rosenbluth is serious about their happiness, so why leave?

Let ’em Surf: With facilities located near the Pacific ocean in Ventura, CA, the management team at Patagonia extend employees a very special perk tailored to their unique location. Realizing that you never know when great waves will hit, management allows employees to go surfing whenever they wish. With the flexibility to hit the beach when the waves are high, employees remain sky high throughout the entire Patagonia facility. Just imagine another organization attempting to lure a Patagonia employee away when the employee asks about their surfing policy.

Stay tuned. I’m on my way to pick up my son at school in the middle of the weekday afternoon. I’m lucky enough to work for an enlightened employer.

NFL Situation Spotlight #109 – Offensive Holding Penalties (OHP)

Those of you that have had a chance to read some of my past articles may have come across a write-up discussing the predictive power behind Play-book Execution Penalties, which are flags thrown when plays break-down, usually on offense. Penalty calls that fall into this category include infractions such as: Intentional Grounding, Ineligible Receivers, Illegal Shifts and Motions, Too Many Men on the Field, and so on.

PBEP’s are not the only measure of team penalties that have been shown to be a profitable tool for spread handicapping: Offensive Holding calls are also the basis for a situation that has produced big profits over the past 7 years– a situation which has been highly effective even with only one Primary condition involved.

The condition I am speaking about is simple, and involves looking at teams that currently have a higher per-game average for Offensive Holding Penalties Against (OHPA) than their current opponent.

As an example, a team that has played 4 games and been flagged 9 times for Offensive Holding during this stretch, would have an OHPA of 2.25 (9 / 4) and would therefore be subject to this situations logic when facing an opponent with an OHPA average of 2.24 or less.

As you might expect, teams with a higher OHPA have not been a good wager over the past 7 seasons. You might be surprised; however, at just how badly they have fared.

Since 2001, teams with a higher OHPA have been a brutal 518-602 (46.3%) ATS when playing between Week 4 and 15, creating a profit of $3,220.00 at 10/11 odds with $110.00 wagers against the team in question. Not bad for a relatively simple situation with 1 Primary condition (OHPA > OP OHPA) and a ‘Secondary’ stipulation (i.e., ‘tightener’) excluding games very early, and very late in the season.

If there is one thing I have learned through the process of handicapping hundreds of NFL games over the past decade-or-so and studying countless trends during this same time period, it’s that, the stats that are ‘off the beaten track’ are usually the ones that produce the most profitable ‘stand-alone’ trends’–meaning, those that are based one single condition or at least a minimal amount of conditions.

You will be hard-pressed to find another situation based on the more common measurements of team skill, such as rushing and passing stats, that could produce a similar result of +/- 85 wins ATS over a 1000-1100 game stretch, especially when it involves only a single ‘building block’, or, ‘Primary’ condition.

The reason for this is actually fairly simple: Most of us know that Vegas sets the NFL line based predominantly on public perception of team strength. This is a point which even most novice handicappers are aware of these days. Sportsbooks get their 10% ‘Vig’ regardless of who wins and losses and it’s always been in their best interest to set lines that produce balanced action which helps to minimize their immediate risk and maximize long-term profits.

With the knowledge that the point spread is more a product of public sentiment, than actual team skill levels in many cases, it becomes fairly safe to assume that the statistics that help to shape public opinion will probably be less effective at handicapping the spread than other, equally effective stats that perhaps ‘fly-below the radar’ of the vast majority of handicappers out there. Those who follow the stock market will be familiar with this concept, which is known as the efficient market theory.

As an example: if everyone made their wagers based solely on season-to-date points differential for each team, Vegas would correct their lines for this fact and using a method of choosing teams based on points scored alone, would ultimately yield a fat 0 dollars profit, if not a loss, over the long-haul.

This example is an over-simplification of course, and bettors will typically take many more things into consideration when making wagers. Having said that, there are certain stats and variables that are used more often-than-not by the average handicapper, week in and week out.

With-out a doubt, rushing and passing stats are the measures of choice for most novice-to-intermediate handicappers along with other obvious ones, such as, points scored and allowed; ‘power’ numbers; injury report data and recent head-to-head results. Most people base their wagering decisions on these kinds of stats because they are both easy to find and easy to understand.

As with the financial markets; however, following the ‘herd’ is more likely to lead you (and your bankroll) over the side of a cliff, rather than to the ‘pot of gold’, and the same rules apply when handicapping the sports-betting market.

This is not to say that basic statistics which focus on such things as the efficiency of a team’s rushing and passing game are to be ignored. On the contrary, I use these fundamental measurements (expressed as yards-per-play differentials) as part of a number of my successful situations. But, a number of other conditions usually need to be added in order to make them truly effective in predicting spread winners.

Getting back to penalties for a moment–beyond the basic penalty yardage totals shown for each team in the final boxscore, the specific types and frequency of certain penalties that teams take are essentially ignored by 99.5% of handicappers, and for the reasons discussed above, these key stats will also not factor too much into the line as a result.

Penalty calls are not the only facet of NFL team play that suffers from a lack of attention, despite their ability to reveal profitable situations versus the spread.

There happens to be quite a few other statistical gems that also fall into the ‘overlooked’ category and one such area concerns special teams play and more specifically, the king of this category–KRYF, which stands for Kick-off Return Yardage (Average) For.

KRYF is a critical stat that is on my ‘shortlist’ of numbers that no good NFL handicapper should be with-out.

It acts as a barometer of overall special teams strength on the most important special teams play of all: the Kick-off return.

Kick-offs are a critical event because of their ability to switch a games momentum in a heart-beat and they provide an opportunity for a team to quickly gobble up crucial yardage that can leave them with decent field position, which is key to any chance of a victory, whether it be SU or ATS.

Nothing deflates a team that just finished putting points on the board more, than an opponent who runs back the ensuing kick-off for 40 yards and we all know the affect that a player like Chicago’s kick-return specialist, Devin Hester, can have on a game’s outcome in the blink of an eye.

The league average for KRYF is usually around 22 yards-per-return. Good teams will find themselves with an average near 25 while lousy return teams will be down near 19 yards-per-return.

KYRF is a stat that I use a lot, and it just happens to be the basis for one of the 2 remaining Primary conditions yet to be discussed. Including the original one involving OHPA, this powerful ‘trifecta’ of negative factors spells doom for the team unlucky enough to meet all of the criteria involved.

Here is how KRYF factors into things: I have found that teams that have a higher OHPA as well as a lower KRYF than their current opponent, have been a dismal 245-332 (42.5%) ATS since 2001, which almost doubles the profit produced from looking at OHPA alone, to $6250.00.

As with OHPA, it makes sense that teams at a disadvantage with regards to KRYF are a poor bet against the spread. The surprise here, once again, is just how profitable it has been historically, when betting against this team based on these 2 simple factors alone.

Now, we are not done quite yet. The final significant stipulation that I like to add also involves special teams, in this case– a comparison of Gross Punt Yardage and Net Punt Yardage concerning the current opponent of the team in question is included.

Subtracting Net Punt Yardage (the yardage achieved by a punt after the return is factored in along with any penalties against the punting team) from Gross Punt Yards (the distance a punt actually traveled from where the ball was snapped) is an excellent way to look at the ability of a team to: A) Execute a punt properly, and B) efficiently cover the ensuing return.

Teams with a poor punt coverage unit or that take a higher-than-average number of penalties during the punt itself; will see a wider gap between their GPYF and NPYF. Teams that have a below-average punter will also have a lower NPYF by extension, as shorter punts do carry a higher risk of big returns if coverage personnel do not have enough time to get into proper position.

The average gap between a team’s GPYF and their NPYF happens to be 6 yards.
By excluding opponents that have a GPYF at least 7 yards higher than their NPYF, we effectively remove opponents that have either poor coverage skills on punts, or a weak punter. Ultimately, this is yet another blow against the team already stinging from the other factors previously discussed.

In summary then: Teams that have a higher per-game average for Offensive Holding Penalties Against (OHPA) along with a lower per-game average for Kick-off Return Yardage For (KRYF)–both in relation to their current opponent–are 142-244 (36.8%) ATS since 2001, so long as this opponent’s Gross Punt Yardage figure is no more than 7 yards bigger than their Net Punt Yardage per-game average.

Based on these 3 Primary conditions (along with the earlier tightener that confines things to Week 4 through 15), we have a trend that has been a consistent winner since ’01 and has produced a profit of $8,780.00 at 10/11 odds during this time period.

Rounding things out, are 2 final limitations, one of which excludes teams who have faced a tough schedule season-to-date (SOS > 0.600) while the other excludes underdogs of >= 7 points. With the addition of these final 2 conditions, the record is reduced to 89-190 (31.9%) ATS–a killer situation that has been a deadly predictor of results ATS, 7 years running.

A brief look at the stats below will show that this is a very balanced trend that has played on every single team in the league, aside from one. And, it is split fairly evenly between favs and dogs as well as home and away teams.

Here are all the details.

(Notes: ASMR stands for Average Spread Margin Rating. A positive rating indicates a trend that is stronger than average versus the line, negative–weaker than average. TDIS% is the percentage of teams in the league that have been involved in this situation at one time or another. WT% is the percentage of teams that are .500 or better and SPR is the average spread for teams in this situation. For more details, please consult Page 13 of my 2007 NFL Game Sheets Guide.)

Situational Trend #109 Summary

Primary Conditions (Building Blocks)
1) Offensive Holding Penalty Average Against (OHPA) > Opponent.
2) Kick-off Return Yardage Average For (KRYF) Secondary Conditions (Tighteners)
1) Game is between Week 4 and 15.
2) Team is not an Underdog of >=7 Points.
3) Strength of Schedule (SOS), season-to-date, is Situation Stats
ASMR: -0.5
Home%: 57.4
Dog%: 44.9
TDIS%: 96.9
WT%: 54.7
SPR: -1.0
Top Teams: TB(18); BUF(16); MIN(16); MIA(15)

Situation Record
Overall (Since ’01): 89-190 ATS
2007 Season: 10-26 ATS
2006 Season: 9-19 ATS
2005 Season: 11-32 ATS
2004 Season: 17-32 ATS

Last 3 Results. Pick in Brackets.
2007 WK15–TEN 26 KC 17 (TEN -3.5) W
2007 WK15–JAC 29 PIT 22 (JAC +3.5) W
2007 WK15–CLE 8 BUF 0 (CLE -6) W